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dee. champion carb consumer. caravaggio aficionada.

i used to have other fandoms but then regina mills happened.

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According to the New Testament, Witness means 'Martyr'. They're destined to die for their testimonies...

"You and I will choose our own destiny. We have free will. I choose to forge my fate with you." [x]

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belikebumblebee replied to your post “Most of my day has been spent observing belikebumblebee flail to death…”

i have watched seventeen episodes in twenty four hours aRE YOU MOCKING ME

NEVER.

I SALUTE YOU AND WHOLEHEATEDLY WELCOME YOU TO THE KALINDA SHARMA ADORATION AND WORSHIP SOCIETY. 

1 note

http://deemnfic.tumblr.com/post/83749320176/cassi0pei4-deemnfic-1-if-i-see-one-more 

cassi0pei4:

WORD. 

There are two problems: mental illness being treated as a sort of cute complication for a character rather than a real thing and people of color almost never getting roles complicated enough for even the “cute complication” variety of things, much less real character development.  

What you said about telling wrongly vs. not telling at all is very interesting to me.  I’ve wondered how people tend to feel about this because it’s just a generally awful choice.  It’s something of a balance, right, because representation that’s too stereotypical can be detrimental to perceptions, but no representation at all is all the more damaging.  The obvious solution is to just do good representation, but hollywood usually fucks up a lot before it stumbles into something decent, and I vacillate in which I think is more detrimental, especially on the macro level of society.  Most often I end up on the side of no representation being much worse, but sometimes I hit the point of, like, look, if that’s how they’re going to represent me, then I’d rather this thing just doesn’t exist.  I think it also varies a lot based on how much other representation is out there.  For example, as problematic as it is for a dramatization of a transwoman or transman to focus a lot on SRS, for the first dramatization that probably wasn’t as much of an issue.  Like for a while it was just great to see anything vaguely familiar to real representation.  Idk.  I have muddled thoughts and I’m drinking tea with sugar so I can’t even blame blood sugar.  

Also, I love reading your posts and you seem awesome.  I’ve been following you for a while but I mostly just lurk and so I haven’t said that to you yet.  

Yes.  That.

As for telling wrongly vs. not telling at all—I think muddled thoughts is probably the best any of us can hope for because it’s just… I mean, basically, it is asking “Would you rather be made a fool or nonexistent?”  And what kind of choice is that?

I mean—I get super excited when I see brown girls on television, but when I see meek voiceless background brown girls I sit there and think I don’t want this, I don’t want this.  But which is more important: that people not be shocked when I, as I do, launch into an opinionated speech on Jane Austen at the drop of a hat, or that people not be shocked when they see me at all?  I’m probably going to go with the latter—at least my existence not be a completely foreign concept.  Maybe it would be more work to have to reset erroneous and reductive conceptions of who I am or should be—but is that so different from life now, for any of us?  

I think of bisexuality, and how it’s so much more work to be considered a person when the idea is “bisexuality isn’t real” as opposed to “bisexuals are promiscuous” or “bisexuals can’t commit.”  

The flip side, of course, is the violence faced by trans folk, or black folk, for the mere audacity of existing.  Because the world recognizes said existence and seeks to wipe it out.  

Basically we are royally fucked in either situation.  And that’s because it’s a false dichotomy but those who recognize it as such are by and large powerless to publicize the middle option, which would be to stop telling stories about the same tired white cishet archetypes.  

I’m holding out hope that the popularity of shows like Scandal and Sleepy Hollow and Elementary and Orange Is The New Black, and of characters like Jessica Pearson and Sophia Burset and Beverly Katz and yes, Regina Mills—that someday soon the importance of these characters and these shows will dawn on people with money and in power.  

I mean… it has to… right?

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When did you start to feel like a father?

When did you start to feel like a father?

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Most of my day has been spent observing belikebumblebee flail to death over The Good Wife and Kalinda Sharma via Tumblr.

This has not been a wasted day.

2 notes

Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet

↳ F → feminism & representation
"I certainly came up in an era where women were really making strides and making a point to beat down doors and find their place, and crash through the glass ceiling. And a lot of them did that believing that they had to trade on their femininity and that they had to be a man and tap into whatever they believed was a masculine trait to hang in the boys’ room, to get the "keys to the kingdom" as it were. And what’s beautiful about Jessica Pearson is that she is the next level to that when, really, feminism is about being all that you are and not having to trade one thing for another on your way up, or apologize." - Gina Torres (about her character Jessica Pearson, on Suits)

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madameatomicbomb:

nightmareloki:

dast303:

Funny things you see at cons: People telling Ra’s Al Ghul how to have an eternal life.
"Funny, I’ve had my eternal life because of the Lazarus Pit"

I laughed into eternity oh my god

That’s definitely an “I know something you don’t know” face. 

madameatomicbomb:

nightmareloki:

dast303:


Funny things you see at cons: People telling Ra’s Al Ghul how to have an eternal life.

"Funny, I’ve had my eternal life because of the Lazarus Pit"

I laughed into eternity oh my god

That’s definitely an “I know something you don’t know” face. 

5,728 notes   •   Via   •   Source
#q   

cassi0pei4:

deemnfic:

1. if i see one more stupid ad for this stupid black box show i’m going to break a tv

2. i am calling it a stupid show because what i can deduce from these stupid ads is that this doctor lady occasionally goes out dancing and drinking and fucking strangers and OMG THAT MAKES HER SO BAD AND INCOMPREHENSIBLE.

over it.

also like really one more show about white lady doctor really one more.

THANK YOU. 

There is basically nothing I like about that show based on the ad and I actually started muting my computer every time it came on.  

1. Don’t sexualize mental illness.  They’re clearly trying to say that the doctor is diagnosed bipolar but they’re also clearly making that synonymous with complicated-chick-who-likes-sex.  People with bipolar I or II aren’t sex objects or objects, period.  If you want your character to have psychological health questions to deal with, cool.  I want to see people like me on the tv, like everyone else.  But do your fucking research ABC.  

2. They’re once again doing the thing where a person gets a million phds and lots of acclaim while in their early 20s because they’re just that awesome.  That’s really detrimental to social norms because it reinforces the false notion that intelligence is an entity or a quantity that we’re born with rather than something that’s incremental and has to be built over time.  The people who actually get introduced to conferences full of neurologists?  They’re basically a minimum of 30 and probably in their 40s.  They’re women who have figured out more of their own identities because they’re dealing with real stereotype threat in a male-dominated field (double that threat, at the very least, if your a woman of color).  I want stories about those women.  I do not want more stories about fake people, who are too young to have really studied anything (6 years for a neuro phd plus a likely 2 year post doc or med school + residency), have diagnoses that are just severe enough to be called “interesting” but don’t deal with anything realistic, and do it all while being white.  

3. It’s yet another show that’s treating medical facts as fluid while never including some kind of disclaimer.  It’s one thing when scifi like Fringe fucks up neuroscience.  It’s another when a show ostensibly set in reality portrays a disadvantaged group (the “mentally ill” as we’re called) in a skewed way for the viewing public without telling them.  

Sorry, I had a lot of feelings.  I hope this wasn’t hijacking a thread.  :/

image

Brief marination on the things you’ve pinpointed in relation to why the lead being white bothers me so, so much:

because if a POC has a mental illness, they aren’t ‘interesting’ and ‘sexy’ or ‘engrossing,’ they’re just more Otherized than ever.  Like, for all the damage that romanticization of mental illness via white characters does to the community at large, the difference between “We’re going to tell your story… wrongly, but we’re going to tell it,” and “We don’t think your story is worth telling at all” is vast and must not be overlooked.

because POC are never the magical geniuses because lol who would believe that???

because the particular position of being a high-functioning x (whatever her diagnosis turns out to be) while also being a woman and of color in closed rank, elitist, supremacist institutions like medical institutions, like higher education, is an unbearable burden without even a fictional guide to navigate by.  [and this partially connects with one of my favorite things about Homeland, which is the constant struggle when it comes to biological treatments to remain high-functioning because somewhere in you, you believe that you could be a little bit faster and smarter and more intuitive and better if you were off your meds—but how long could you be off your meds before you started to careen out into wrongness?]

because POC are misdiagnosed and misdirected and rejected by psychiatry regularly and here was an opportunity to show the process of diagnosis and methods of treatment and how to recognize good treatment and how to recognize bad treatment and what questions to ask—goddamnit.  here was a chance to model what we should be looking for if we are able to seek help and instead we’re going to go with the magical literally manic pixie white girl with enough privilege to disregard treatment because… 

because… why?  because no one believes that people will tune in to a show about a woman of color? still? because why make a show about a woman of color?

it’s either the intersection of casual racism and capitalism, or it’s staunch racism.  either way, it’s bullshit.

annesteele:

I know that wasn’t easy for you.
Sure it was.

annesteele:

I know that wasn’t easy for you.

Sure it was.

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#idol   #archie panjabi   #q   

numblebee:

that funny thing where every character you liked as a child turned out to be evil, dead or both becomes a lot less hilarious once you realise you’re gay

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mysoulisonfire:

Get to know me » 2/5 female characters
     ↳ Dr. Joan Watson (Elementary)

"Too angry to be afraid."

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eshusplayground:

deemnfic:

elsodex:

deemnfic:

image

elsodex replied to your post “if the sq zorro au becomes a thing I might cry a lot”

HENRY IS TORNADO. But you could always reimagine it. Like Henry Sr. was Zorro and Regina took up the mantle despite his protests, just as the Mexican-American war reaches California. Now Zorro must negotiate the war around and within herself.

WHY ARE YOU ENCOURAGING MY MADNESS.

Read More

I’ve sort of accepted that this is just gonna be our thing until we crank out an original piece.

But see? That’s why having Cora being this super overpowering presence who actually forces Henry Sr. into retirement and to hide the mantle from Regina works. It allows for the same dynamic from the show, while giving an opportunity to explore the negotiation of identity that happens with kids like me who are both White and Latin@. Her upbringing, like the surrounding war, becomes a larger metaphor of self. It’s also a pretty effective critique of the whole “I can’t be racist cause I married a [x, y, z]”. Like, no—no, you most certainly can because that was in fact one of the most reliable means of colonization.

But you don’t want the audience to think you’re saying “no mixing—mixing is bad" cause obviously that’s not the case, so you juxtapose it with Emma and Regina.

Cora/Henry Sr = Unhealthy.
Regina/Emma = HEALTHY.

Hell, if you wanted too you could even veer into the Weird West subgenre and give Cora magic. Then again, there’s SO MUCH TO UNPACK in there that I’m sort of like…eh, maybe another time.

I had to google Queen of Swords, and…and I’m going to deeply regret this aren’t I?

OH HEY REMEMBER HOW WE KEEP MEANING TO TALK ABOUT PASSING AND MIXING.

Aha, okay, having Cora as still the domineering presence changes everything.  [I figured tried and true ‘dead momma’ trope.  Silly me.]  

So… Henry Sr. as independence activist in a mask during war of independence; upon American incursions in the north, Cora forces him into hiding with a hardcore dose of white supremacist, “I know the situation I know how to survive this you’re just a x y z you’re their target  can protect us” or something.  [Can we place them right on the border of Texas can we can we can we.]  

How would you depict Regina both ‘discovering’ and (rapidly) internalizing Henry Sr.’s activism?  I’m assuming of course that Cora would attempt to systematically eliminate visible markers of Latina-ness from her personality so it could easily be ‘reactive’ in that here is an outlet where Regina’s identity matters exactly as she is.  

The juxtaposition would then be… Cora as colonizing force, Emma as… assimilating?  Would that be the right term?  Deferential to Regina’s cultural identity and ‘nationalist’ leanings (wow I’ve forgotten all of my terminology) and also her SuperSekritIdentity.  Ooh, and then we get into the problems of “selling out” because how does someone like Regina the heroine of the people who knows exactly how much it matters to be Mexican/Tejana end up with a white girl.  

And, uh, speaking of which—navigating female queerness in mid-19th century Mexico?

The power dynamics around Regina as an independent female operator in the middle of a race-conflict of two historically patriarchal nations… how amused am I that writing that would be no different than writing the Evil Queen in FTL?  Oh, right, not at all amused.

/ Dude, I am so sorry. You are going to regret it so hard.

Actually, I guess I should take blame for this thing going around.

"Encanta" apparently gave a friend of mine the idea of putting Regina into a partnership with Cassandra Cain for his new piece.

And now you guys are doing Zorro.

I’m afraid there’s no cure except to do this.

My bad.

*POINTS FINGER* WITCHCRAFT!!!

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nayarivera:

So happy to be back to brunette! Thank you again to Rebecca at Goodform salon for taking me back to my roots!

nayarivera:

So happy to be back to brunette! Thank you again to Rebecca at Goodform salon for taking me back to my roots!

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elsodex:

deemnfic:

image

elsodex replied to your post “if the sq zorro au becomes a thing I might cry a lot”

HENRY IS TORNADO. But you could always reimagine it. Like Henry Sr. was Zorro and Regina took up the mantle despite his protests, just as the Mexican-American war reaches California. Now Zorro must negotiate the war around and within herself.

WHY ARE YOU ENCOURAGING MY MADNESS.

Read More

I’ve sort of accepted that this is just gonna be our thing until we crank out an original piece.

But see? That’s why having Cora being this super overpowering presence who actually forces Henry Sr. into retirement and to hide the mantle from Regina works. It allows for the same dynamic from the show, while giving an opportunity to explore the negotiation of identity that happens with kids like me who are both White and Latin@. Her upbringing, like the surrounding war, becomes a larger metaphor of self. It’s also a pretty effective critique of the whole “I can’t be racist cause I married a [x, y, z]”. Like, no—no, you most certainly can because that was in fact one of the most reliable means of colonization.

But you don’t want the audience to think you’re saying “no mixing—mixing is bad" cause obviously that’s not the case, so you juxtapose it with Emma and Regina.

Cora/Henry Sr = Unhealthy.
Regina/Emma = HEALTHY.

Hell, if you wanted too you could even veer into the Weird West subgenre and give Cora magic. Then again, there’s SO MUCH TO UNPACK in there that I’m sort of like…eh, maybe another time.

I had to google Queen of Swords, and…and I’m going to deeply regret this aren’t I?

OH HEY REMEMBER HOW WE KEEP MEANING TO TALK ABOUT PASSING AND MIXING.

Aha, okay, having Cora as still the domineering presence changes everything.  [I figured tried and true ‘dead momma’ trope.  Silly me.]  

So… Henry Sr. as independence activist in a mask during war of independence; upon American incursions in the north, Cora forces him into hiding with a hardcore dose of white supremacist, “I know the situation I know how to survive this you’re just a x y z you’re their target  can protect us” or something.  [Can we place them right on the border of Texas can we can we can we.]  

How would you depict Regina both ‘discovering’ and (rapidly) internalizing Henry Sr.’s activism?  I’m assuming of course that Cora would attempt to systematically eliminate visible markers of Latina-ness from her personality so it could easily be ‘reactive’ in that here is an outlet where Regina’s identity matters exactly as she is.  

The juxtaposition would then be… Cora as colonizing force, Emma as… assimilating?  Would that be the right term?  Deferential to Regina’s cultural identity and ‘nationalist’ leanings (wow I’ve forgotten all of my terminology) and also her SuperSekritIdentity.  Ooh, and then we get into the problems of “selling out” because how does someone like Regina the heroine of the people who knows exactly how much it matters to be Mexican/Tejana end up with a white girl.  

And, uh, speaking of which—navigating female queerness in mid-19th century Mexico?

The power dynamics around Regina as an independent female operator in the middle of a race-conflict of two historically patriarchal nations… how amused am I that writing that would be no different than writing the Evil Queen in FTL?  Oh, right, not at all amused.

/ Dude, I am so sorry. You are going to regret it so hard.

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